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  • Meridian
  • Primary School
  • Comberton, Cambridge
  • Learning for life, striving for excellence

Feedback and Marking

Feedback and Marking 

It is important that we model our school values whilst marking children’s work and providing valuable feedback. That means encourage confidence and responsibility, be courteous to all our learners and be ambitious and challenging.

Purposes of feedback

  • To enable children to improve their work, responsibly and confidently
  • To enable the child to know how to take the ‘next step’.
  • To model learning approaches and methods
  • To motivate children
  • To serve as a record of progress and achievements
  • To provide the teacher with feedback on how well the pupils have understood the current work and enable him/her to plan the next stage of teaching and learning
  • To enable the teacher to make judgements about pupil attainment and pupil progress at particular points of the year.

 

General guidelines for written feedback

 

Focus of feedback

Feedback will usually be based on learning objectives (LO) or success criteria (SC). LO is defined as new learning to be covered within the lesson or across the week

SC is defined as the steps needed in order to make the learning or outcome successful within the lesson. This can be differentiated.

 

Marking and feedback for the autumn term will primarily be based on punctuation, spelling and grammar in all writing and cross curricular writing.

 

The detail of the feedback depends on:

  • Individual needs
  • Group needs
  • What subject it is in
  • School targets
  • A sustainable level of work

 

When it is possible to work with a pupil in class and give verbal feedback this can ease workload as well as being particularly effective for developing learning.

 

There is no single ‘right’ way of providing feedback – the strategy used should be appropriate for the purpose and context of the work.

 

  1. assessment and feedback is not necessarily better. Following through with feedback is essential to developing good habits in children.

 

If remote marking is used, children need to be given time at the beginning or end of an activity or timetabled during the week to read or respond to it. Children should respond to feedback using purple pens and this should be evident in all books in all year groups where a response is necessary.

 

All staff should use the marking codes provided.

 

Supply teachers, cover supervisors and Teaching Assistants should initial work they have marked and state whether the work was mostly independent or not.

 

Annotated plans should be given at timely intervals as part of monitoring.

 

What feedback looks like in Literacy

All work must be marked. At least one piece of extended writing should be marked in detail each week. Improvements in progressive work must be evident.

 

All written work will be at least marked against LO and/ or SC.

Annotated plans should be given at timely intervals as part of monitoring.

 

Self or peer marking

Children may mark straightforward answers, for example spellings, cloze procedures or simple comprehension exercises. Teachers look at these to see if any action or further planning is necessary.

 

What feedback looks like in Mathematics

All written work will be marked. All areas of misunderstanding should be addressed whether verbal feedback (VF) or written. Improvements in progressive work must be evident.

Wider misunderstandings can be noted on plans and addressed in future lessons. Annotated plans should be given at timely intervals as part of monitoring.

 

Self or peer marking

Children can self and pair mark where appropriate. However teachers still need to look at this self marked work and misunderstandings need to be addressed.

 

What feedback looks like in Science

All written work will be at least marked against the LO or SC.

Feedback is generally based on understanding and knowledge of scientific processes.

All areas of misunderstanding should be addressed.

Wider misunderstandings can be noted on plans and addressed in future lessons

Annotated plans should be given at timely intervals as part of monitoring.

 

Self or peer marking

Children can self and pair mark where appropriate. However teachers still need to look at this self marked work and misunderstandings need to be addressed.

 

What feedback looks like in History, Geography and RE

All recorded work will be at least marked.

Feedback is generally based on achieving the learning objective or success criteria.

All areas of misunderstanding should be addressed.

Wider misunderstandings can be noted on plans and addressed in future lessons

Annotated plans should be given at timely intervals as part of monitoring.

 

Self or peer marking

Children may mark very clear questions, for example one word answers or simple comprehension exercises.

 

What feedback looks like in Physical Education

Verbal feedback at the time of the activity is the main form of feedback.

Feedback usually takes the form of examples and demonstrations

Mini plenaries are used to help to address misconceptions during lesson.

Wider misunderstandings can be noted on plans and addressed in future lessons

Annotated plans should be given at timely intervals as part of monitoring.

 

Self or peer feedback

This is based on the Learning Objective and Success Criteria.

The children evaluate the outcome of skills learnt

 

What feedback looks like in Art and Design and Technology, computing, PSHE and music

Verbal feedback is the primary method of feedback

Feedback usually takes the form of examples and demonstrations.

Mini plenaries are used to help to address misconceptions during lesson.

Wider misunderstandings can be noted on plans and addressed in future lessons

Annotated plans should be given at timely intervals as part of monitoring.

 

Self or peer feedback

This is based on the learning objective and success criteria.

The children evaluate the outcome of skills learnt (and product)

 

 

What feedback looks like in EYFS

Verbal feedback is the most appropriate for Foundation Stage children. Any written feedback on a child’s work should be shared with child and as much as possible marked in front of the child.

On-going assessment outcomes are kept in each child’s learning journals.

 

Responsibilities

It is the responsibility of the literacy lead (senior teacher), maths lead (deputy head) and Headteacher:

 

  • To monitor the consistent use of this policy across the school
  • To ensure the policy is reviewed and at least annually
  • Share developments with the C and L committee.

 

It is the responsibility of all classroom teachers:

 

  • to ensure that all classwork is marked according to the feedback policy
  • to explain the marking system to their pupils
  • to ensure that assessment information informs further curriculum planning
  • to be aware of children’s individual needs and modify their comments appropriately
  • to model clear instructions and joined handwriting when giving written feedback in books

 

This policy does not have an unfair or unreasonable impact on pupils or staff who have a protected characteristic (age, disability, ethnicity and race, gender, gender identity, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, religion and belief, sexual identity and orientation).

 

 

 

N.B.Teachers use only blue or green pen to mark. Blue pen for general marking. Green pen for challenge marking/ extending the learning.

 

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to all our families. Our last day is 19th December 2018. Children return on 7th January 2019.

MeridianPrimary School

  • Harbour Avenue
  • Comberton
  • Cambridge
  • CB23 7DD
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